TRIBUTE for my father Christopher O. Okoye

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Tribute

……. And the drums finally sound

proclaiming the dawn of twilight

the journey must begin

and a Titan must go

and I must say my goodbyes

Oh God!

No! change the beat

No more the sombre haze

Beat me the drums of quiet achievement

That I may dance with silent steps

And celebrate the passing of a sage

‘when beggars die

there are no comets seen

the heavens themselves

declare the death of princes’

they see it only that look to see.

Each sharp beat cringes the tears

Clean me a trumpet for I will blow

Each note telling the things learned

In the quiet of everyday.

Let other instruments join in the song

Each new note telling a new thing

About my everyday father

Neither the memoirs of service

Nor the bundles of wreaths

Tell enough the everyday duties done

That there might be to eat

That there be wisdom enough to live

Most of the eighty, you gave to others

Hear them that talk of fruit of labour

Fruit of labour is not food nor drink

But the joy of seeing your prayers done

And the sharing that appreciation brings

It is simply knowing the sacrifices made

Though they be unrequited

Hush!

Cut out the sound of wailing

Would that my eyes would follow my heart

But they know better

What they never again would see

For indeed my everyday father is gone!

Yet is my heart strong.

‘for much is taken

yet much remains’

now the door opens seven ways

when you go

do not go

peep in on us

that we may hear your wisdom in our need

and you can say it in silence

for we can as one all hear it

the sounds of silence

silence is the medium

For we are not left comfortless

For as long as silence remains

We will always hear you

And you will be in our silence

Now will I turn my back

For I cannot watch you go.

J. Chuma Okoye

2 Comments

  1. Lawrence Umoren said,

    I strongly share in this sentiments having been privileged to be thought by him. May his soul rest in peace,

  2. Dave Emmy Okoye said,

    yes! To your everyday father, I have also an everyday father. The doors…seven ways opened….am ONE! In one wisdom laden sentence, he settles every dispute. when all other is up on there feet, he continues on his knees. Shuts the door after every sleeping head; my everyday father…never for once dishonoured; chose to remain taciturn when every other person is babbling.

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